Explore cutting edge science topics, their latest developments, and their relevance to society through speaker presentations followed by question-and-answer period with the audience.

 

The Fall 2022 Science Inquiry Series

The Science Inquiry Series returns to in-person presentations at the Museum of the Rockies’ Hager Auditorium this fall, sponsored by the Gallatin Valley Friends of the Sciences, and co-sponsored by the Museum of the Rockies and non-profit community service organization Hopa Mountain.

On September 28, Dr. Neil Cornish, MSU Regents Professor of Physics, will describe the hunt for the universe’s first black holes using a new space mission; on October 19, acclaimed science writer David Quammen will discuss his latest book chronicling how science and scientists rose to the global challenge of fighting COVID-19; and on November 16, Dr. Lance NcNew, MSU Associate Professor of Wildlife Habitat Ecology, will explain the importance public and private land management in preserving rangeland bird species and other wildlife.

The talks are free to the public; face masks are recommended but not required. To learn more, see Upcoming Presentations.

 

Science Inquiry Series Hunts for the Earliest Black Holes

What role did the universe’s first black holes play in the formation and growth of the earliest galaxies?  Dr. Neil Cornish, MSU Regents Professor of Physics, will address this question in the first presentation of the Fall 2022 Science Inquiry Series.

The talk will be presented in the Museum of the Rockies’ Hager Auditorium on Wednesday, September 28, at 7 pm in a return to in-person presentations.  It is sponsored by the Gallatin Valley Friends of the Sciences and co-sponsored by the Museum of the Rockies and the non-profit community service organization Hopa Mountain.

The series explores cutting edge science topics, their latest developments, and their relevance to society through speaker presentations followed by questions from the audience.  The talks are free to the public.  Face masks are recommended but not required.

Courtesy of NASA.

In his presentation, titled “Hunting Black Holes at Cosmic Dawn,” Cornish will describe how a new space mission called the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will detect gravitational ripples from the collisions of the earliest black holes, formed just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang.  The results will provide key insights into the earliest days of the universe.

Dr. Cornish holds a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto, and served a postdoctoral appointment with Stephen Hawking’s research group at the University of Cambridge.  He also worked on the NASA WMAP cosmic microwave background mission at Princeton University.  He is founding director of MSU’s eXtreme Gravity Institute in gravitational astrophysics, which played a prominent role in the first detection of gravitational waves in 2015.  Cornish is a member of the NASA science team for the upcoming LISA mission.

The presentation will be followed by a question-and-answer period.

 

Keep up on the world of science with this feature offering links to selected online articles in a variety of disciplines.

September’s Featured Article:

From space.com:
Did a Second Killer Asteroid Finish the Dinosaurs Off?

For additional article links, click on the “Science Link” tab above (under the banner).

 

Photo by SpaceX on Unsplash.

Click on the “Initiatives” tab above (under the banner) to learn about current science-based initiatives.  Current topic: climate change.

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