Upcoming Presentations

2019 Winter/Spring Science Inquiry Series

Explore cutting edge science topics, their latest developments, and their relevance to society through speaker presentations followed by conversations between speaker and audience.

Sponsored by the Gallatin Valley Friends of the Sciences, and hosted by the Museum of the Rockies, 600 W Kagy Blvd, Bozeman, Montana, the talks are presented on Wednesday evenings at 7 pm, followed by a brief social time with light refreshments in the museum lobby where audience members can engage the speaker.

The talks are free to the public.

 

2019 Mar 13 – Dangerous Snow:  Understanding How Avalanches Happen and How to Stay Safer

How and why do avalanches “release” and how can an improved understanding improve backcountry safety?  Dr. Karl Birkeland, Director of the Forest Service’s National Avalanche Center, will offer the results of several decades of research on when snowpack conditions become avalanche prone, and how better understanding of avalanches can improve safety for those involved in winter activities.

Karl Birkeland in the snow
Image Courtesy Karl Birkeland, National Avalanche Center.

 

2019 Apr 17 – Dinosaurs on “the Cutting-Edge”:  Understanding Extinct Animals through Paleohistology

How can the microscopic examination of fossilized specimens shed light on dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures?  Ellen-Thérèse Lamm, the Museum of the Rockies’ Histology Lab Manager, will describe the “cutting-edge” thin-sectioning and microscopy techniques she uses, and how the work of the lab allows researchers, students, and investigators from around the word to make important discoveries about ancient life.

Photomicrograph of T-rex rib specimen collected from US Fish & Wildlife Service Lands.
Image ©2010 Museum of the Rockies – Montana State University. All Rights Reserved.
Photomicrograph of T-rex rib specimen collected from US Fish & Wildlife Service Lands.

 

2019 May 15 – Using Technology to Fight the Flu—One Cell at a Time

How can technology be used to combat stubborn viruses like influenza? Dr. Connie Chang, assistant professor in MSU’s Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, will discuss how creating and processing tiny droplets containing individual virus-infected cells can help to develop therapies to fight viral diseases.

Microfluid Droplets
Photo courtesy of Dr. Connie Chang